Brain Foods

Brain Foods

Posted by Safe In4 Hub

Dosage Information

Dosage Information

There is no established recommended daily intake for omega-3s, but a healthy diet containing significant amounts of foods rich in this essential fatty acid is clearly wise. By increasing your intake of omega-3 fatty acids, you will naturally bring the ratio of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids back into a healthier, 2-1 or (optimally) 1-1 balance.

Try to reduce your consumption of omega-6-rich foods at the same time that you increase your intake of omega-3-rich foods in the following categories:

--Marine sources: Atlantic salmon and other fatty, preferably cold-water fish, including herring (both Atlantic and Pacific), sardines, Atlantic halibut, bluefish, tuna, and Atlantic mackerel. The American Heart Association recommends that people eat tuna or salmon at least twice a week.

As a reasonable substitute (or even an occasional alternative) for fresh fish, commercial fish oil capsules are available containingomega-3s such as DHA and EPA.

--Wild game: Surprisingly, venison and buffalo are both good sources of omega-3s and make a healthy choice for people craving meat. These wild game meats can be purchased through mail-order sources if your supermarket doesn't carry them.

--Plant sources: Canola oil, flaxseed, flaxseed oil, walnuts, and leafy green vegetables such as purslane are all good sources of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the plant-based omega-3. A quarter-cup (1 ounce) of walnuts supplies about 2 grams of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids, slightly more than is found in 3 ounces of salmon. WholehealthMD's extensive Healing Kitchen provides details on the nutrients in many of these foods, as well as recipes to include in your diet.

--Enhanced food: In the U.S., these include omega-3 enriched eggs; breads are sometimes enhanced in other countries.


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