Cosmetic Surgery

Cosmetic Surgery

Posted by Safe In4 Hub

Before Tummy Tuck Surgery

A personal consultation is the first step for a patient considering a Tummy Tuck. A doctor and the patient will discuss the patient's concerns about his or her appearance. Digital photography and computer imaging are used to demonstrate the benefits one can expect to see in the physical anatomy after a Tummy Tuck, as well as where the abdominal incisions will be located.

Finally, a doctor will do a physical examination to assess the quality of the abdominal skin, the location of any existing scars, the degree of excess fat and the tone of the underlining musculature.

The patient will be provided with a booklet that provides detailed pre- and post-operative instructions, including the use of medications prior to surgery. There are directions to discontinue any aspirin and aspirin-containing products, including anti-inflammatory products, two weeks before and two weeks after surgery as these products have a negative effect on clotting ability. The pre-operative instructions include a complete list of medications that could pose hazards and therefore, should be avoided. However, know that Tylenol (acetaminophen) can be safely taken during this time. The booklet also provides a list of vitamins and homeopathic preparations that promote healing and limit bruising that the patient can opt to take before and after surgery.

A doctor will order blood tests that need to be done prior to surgery so that he and the anesthesiologist will know that the blood count and blood chemistry are within normal limits, indicating that the surgery and the anesthesia should be safe for the patient. These blood tests include, but may not be limited to, a CBC (Complete Blood Count) and an Electrolyte Panel. A patient's medical history may require that additional tests be ordered. If a patient is 50 years old or older, or has any personal history of heart disease, an EKG will be required, as well.

The patient is given prescriptions that need to be filled before the surgery date. These prescriptions include an antibiotic (usually Keflex) and Reglan, a medication that prepares the digestive tract for anesthesia. The patient also receives prescriptions for pain medication (Vicodin or similar) and a muscle relaxant (Robaxin) and will be advised to have an over-the-counter stool softener on hand.

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